dynamic verb

n. (Grammar) verb that may be used in the progressive or continuous aspect indicating an incomplete action (e.g.: "Tom is lying on the sofa" - indicating an incomplete action in progress)

English contemporary dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dynamic verb — A dynamic or finitive verb is a verb that shows continued or progressive action on the part of the subject. This is the opposite of a stative verb. Dynamic verbs have duration, that is, they occur over time. This time may or may not have a… …   Wikipedia

  • dynamic verb — /daɪˈnæmɪk vɜb/ (say duy namik verb) noun Grammar a verb which indicates an action or process, as The child jumps, or The light fades. Compare stative verb. Also, action verb …   Australian English dictionary

  • dynamic — 1 adjective 1 full of energy and new ideas, and determined to succeed: a dynamic young businesswoman 2 technical continuously moving or changing: Markets are dynamic and a company must learn to adapt. 3 technical connected with a force or power… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Dynamic logic (modal logic) — For the subject in digital electronics also known as clocked logic, see dynamic logic (digital electronics). Dynamic logic is an extension of modal logic originally intended for reasoning about computer programs and later applied to more general… …   Wikipedia

  • Verb — This article is about the part of speech. For the physical activity program, see VERB (program). For English usage of verbs, see English verbs. Verbs redirects here. For the Christian gospel rapper, see Verbs (rapper). Examples I washed the car… …   Wikipedia

  • dynamic — dy•nam•ic [[t]daɪˈnæm ɪk[/t]] adj. Also, dy•nam′i•cal. 1) vigorously active or forceful; energetic 2) characterized by or producing change or progression: a dynamic process[/ex] 3) phs a) of or pertaining to force or power b) of or pertaining to… …   From formal English to slang

  • dynamic — [19] Greek dūnamis (a word of unknown origin) meant ‘strength’. It was used by the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel in 1867 to form the name of the new explosive he had invented, dynamite. From it was derived the adjective dunamikós ‘powerful’, which …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • dynamic — [dʌɪ namɪk] adjective 1》 (of a process or system) characterized by constant change or activity.     ↘(of a person) full of energy and new ideas. 2》 Physics relating to forces producing motion. Often contrasted with static. 3》 relating to the… …   English new terms dictionary

  • dynamic — [19] Greek dūnamis (a word of unknown origin) meant ‘strength’. It was used by the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel in 1867 to form the name of the new explosive he had invented, dynamite. From it was derived the adjective dunamikós ‘powerful’, which …   Word origins

  • Stative verb — A stative verb is one which asserts that one of its arguments has a particular property (possibly in relation to its other arguments). Statives differ from other aspectual classes of verbs in that they are static; they have no duration and no… …   Wikipedia

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